Frequently Asked Questions

How many Cape Sensors do I need to monitor my network?

As a rule of thumb, place at least one sensor in each of the areas where your users congregate and use WiFi the most, or areas with WiFi performance concerns. In large networks with multiple access and aggregation switches, consider placing at least one sensor per access switch. In most cases, plan for one sensors for every 6 access points (in smaller venues) up to every 24 access points (for larger venues). When in doubt, start smaller—it is easy to add more sensors over time. See our Sensor Guide for more.

Where can I place Cape Sensors?

Each sensor should be as close to users as possible. You can place it on a desk, or use the mounting plate to mount it on a wall or pillar. The mounting bracket works on ceilings too, but the sensor will provide better data on a wall or desk. Avoid placing sensors inside closets, near metal, or within 7 feet (2 metres) of an Access Point. You can use either POE or AC as a power source.

I have a captive portal. Can Cape test the captive portal experience?

Yes! Cape is perfect for testing captive portals. We've found that captive portals can generate a disproportional percentage of the issues we detect. Get in touch to find out how to setup captive portal testing.

How secure are Cape Sensors?

We have engineered our sensors with security in mind. In short, if your network allows BYOD or IoT devices, the Cape Sensor is likely to be more secure than other devices on your network today. Several large companies with strict security policies trust our sensors on their internal networks. See our Security Policy for more.

Can I move Cape Sensors after installing them?

Yes, but we don't typically recommend it. Moving a sensor means the new data it collects is not comparable with it's historical data. If you would like a device to move around to trouble spots in response to user complaints we recommend keeping a spare sensor for temporary, tactical deployments. Alternatively consider preemptively placing additional sensors in areas where users congragate or use WiFi the most.

What mobile networks are supported?

Mobile coverage is required to ensure that the setup process is fully automated, as well as for the sensor's backup and status reporting to function correctly. Supported providers are:
    - T-Mobile within the USA
    - Vodacom within South Africa
    - OneSIM within New Zealand

How many Cape Sensors do I need to monitor my network?

As a rule of thumb, place at least one sensor in each of the areas where your users congregate and use WiFi the most, or areas with WiFi performance concerns. In large networks with multiple access and aggregation switches, consider placing at least one sensor per access switch. In most cases, plan for one sensors for every 6 access points (in smaller venues) up to every 24 access points (for larger venues). When in doubt, start smaller—it is easy to add more sensors over time. See our Sensor Guide for more.

Where can I place Cape Sensors?

Each sensor should be as close to users as possible. You can place it on a desk, or use the mounting plate to mount it on a wall or pillar. The mounting bracket works on ceilings too, but the sensor will provide better data on a wall or desk. Avoid placing sensors inside closets, near metal, or within 7 feet (2 metres) of an Access Point. You can use either POE or AC as a power source.

I have a captive portal. Can Cape test the captive portal experience?

Yes! Cape is perfect for testing captive portals. We've found that captive portals can generate a disproportional percentage of the issues we detect. Get in touch to find out how to setup captive portal testing.

How secure are Cape Sensors?

We have engineered our sensors with security in mind. In short, if your network allows BYOD or IoT devices, the Cape Sensor is likely to be more secure than other devices on your network today. Several large companies with strict security policies trust our sensors on their internal networks. See our Security Policy for more.

Can I move Cape Sensors after installing them?

Yes, but we don't typically recommend it. Moving a sensor means the new data it collects is not comparable with it's historical data. If you would like a device to move around to trouble spots in response to user complaints we recommend keeping a spare sensor for temporary, tactical deployments. Alternatively consider preemptively placing additional sensors in areas where users congragate or use WiFi the most.

What mobile carriers are supported?

Mobile coverage is required to ensure that the setup process is fully automated, as well as for the sensor's backup and status reporting to function correctly. Supported providers are:
    - T-Mobile within the USA
    - Vodacom within South Africa
    - OneSIM within New Zealand